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Zootopia [2016] [PG] - 1.3.2

 
 

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ASSIGNED NUMBERS

Unlike the MPAA we do not assign one inscrutable rating based on age, but 3 objective ratings for SEX/NUDITY, VIOLENCE/GORE and PROFANITY on a scale of 0 to 10, from lowest to highest, depending on quantity and context.

 [more »]


Sex & Nudity
Violence & Gore
Profanity
1 to 10

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» IMDb Listing


Zootopia is a multicultural mammal community with 12 climate zones, where prey and predators live together in peace. A female bunny (voiced by Ginnifer Goodwin) becomes the first rabbit on the police force, but encounters discrimination and bullying. Obstructed by her boss (voiced by Idris Elba), she works with a sly fox (voiced by Jason Bateman) who can be a creative problem solver. Also with the voices of Shakira, JK Simmons, Jenny Slate and Alan Tudyk. Directed by Byron Howard, Rich Moore & Jared Bush. [1:48]

SEX/NUDITY 1 - A female rabbit holds hands with her rabbit husband. An otter couple hugs.
 A meditation spa shows a "pleasure pool" where pigs slide in mud, bears rub their backs on trees, etc. supposedly nude; a bunny hides her eyes from the "naked" animals. A female gazelle singer in a halter top sings and dances on three cellphone screens shaking her backside.
 Animals tell a joke twice: "What do you call a camel with three humps? Pregnant." A female shrew has a swollen belly under her tent dress and we hear that she is pregnant.

VIOLENCE/GORE 3 - A rabbit chases a DVD bootlegging weasel into a neighborhood of tiny mice; the weasel uses two tiny cars as roller skates, speeding and nearly leveling a row of narrow buildings, causing tiny mice to run and scream as the weasel stands on a moving El train and the rabbit hangs from a bar above it, grabbing the weasel by the throat; a huge donut sign rolls nearby after the weasel kicked it off a roof and the rabbit sticks the weasel into the hole of it, then rolls him into a police station and presents a bag full of plant bulbs that turn out to be drugs (please see the Substance Use category for more details) and the Chief shouts at her.
 A rabbit police officer and a fox break into a dark garage and find deep claw marks all over the back seat of a car; the fox becomes agitated and declares that they must leave but they are stopped by two polar bears that grab them and take them to a mafia boss that shouts, "Ice them!"; a trap door opens and the bears hold the captives over a pool of ice, snow and cold water, but soon release them. A weasel is brought to a mafia boss and he yells, "Ice him!"; a polar bear holds the captive over the water until he gives information.
 A fox child bullies and slaps a bunny twice in the head, leaving three pink gashes across one cheek until the bunny kicks the fox in the face with both feet and escapes. A fox child tries to join a scout group of non-predators and they beat him up, leaving pink gouges on one cheek and his face covered with a muzzle. We see photo images (animated) of large animals with steel muzzles.
 A rabbit and a fox question a jaguar who has a closed eye covered by three long slash scars until the cat becomes wildly savage, chasing them over tree limbs and through hollow logs, snapping sharp teeth and roaring and he roars toward the audience; the rabbit nearly falls over a bridge and into water before handcuffing the cat's leg to a pole, but he escapes.
 A rabbit and fox approach wolves wearing suits at a dam and waterfall, tricking them into howling at the moon so that they can break into a building where they find a dark storage room of rusty hospital beds and a wheelchair and we see long claw marks etched into the floor; they find an operating table and X-rays of brains hung around another room and glass cages contain big cats, bears, other predators, and an otter that roar, snarl and fling themselves against the glass; a lion and a scientist badger discuss how the animals were drugged (please see the Substance Use category for more details) and should be hidden.
 A rabbit and a fox find an old train car at an abandoned subway station where a sheep makes illegal drugs (please see the Substance Use category for more details); a ram and the sheep attack the first two animals as the car begins to move and the ram accidentally butts the sheep out a window and into a wall, where the train car speeds past and shaves his belly; the rabbit kicks the shouting ram off the car as the car falls sideways to avoid hitting an oncoming train and sprays a large amount of sparks before hitting a wall.
 A rabbit and a fox run through a natural history museum and a sheep points a dart gun at them as they fall into a display; the sheep shoots the fox (we learn it was only a blueberry in the gun and we see the fox roar, snap his teeth and pretend to become savage), police officers stand by to help the sheep as the fox seems to grab the rabbits throat as a other police officers arrive and arrests the other officers and the sheep as the rabbit and fox laugh.
 An otter begs police to find her lost husband and the Chief tells a rabbit that she has 48 hours to find the husband or turn in her badge; the rabbit stops a fox for tax evasion and uses his crime as blackmail to force him to help her find the otter and they see traffic surveillance tapes of the otter becoming madly savage, snarling and hissing, snapping his sharp teeth as he runs though streets and disappears.
 A leopard in a school play growls at a bunny and chases it to center stage where the bunny falls and pulls out yards of red ribbon to represent blood and squirts a catsup bottle from her throat as she lies on the stage, and then stands up uninjured.
 A rabbit falls and we see a long red gash on one leg, which a fox binds up with a bandana. A rabbit kicks a rhino's glove during a sparring session, making the rhino punch himself with his own hand and we see spit and some droplets of blood spray. A rabbit punches a fox in the shoulder and he yelps. A female rabbit goes through a police academy obstacle course, falling over an ice wall, becoming muddy in a crawling drill, and falling during sparring practice as her trainer (a female polar bear) shouts, "You're dead!"
 Alarm lights flash and three wolves with handguns search for burglars in a building; a fox and a rabbit inside jump down a toilet and escape through the sewers into a river as we see police arrest a lion and a badger. Two animal police officers chase and stop a speeding sports car and they discover that it is driven by a slow moving sloth.
 An elephant ice cream store owner scoops sundaes with his trunk and sprays peanuts and toppings onto sundaes through his trunk; a rabbit police officer tells the elephant that he is breaking health codes and declares snot and mucous are in the sundaes, at which comment two large animals at a table spit their ice cream across the room in surprise and the rabbit blackmails the owner with this info into serving foxes, which he is prejudiced against.
 A rabbit's parents give her fox repellant and a fox Taser that sparks during a demonstration. An otter wakes up in a hospital, cured of poisoning. A bunny falls into a toilet behind a stall door and we see and hear a splash while we see trousers around the ankles of a polar bear in the next stall and hear a voice call out, "You're dead!" A mangy yak wears a constant swarm of buzzing flies around his mane and face in one scene. A rabbit accidentally stands in wet concrete up to her knees as beaver workers glare at her. We see several characters in jail wearing orange jumpsuits.
 A rabbit police officer doubles her quota of parking tickets and city residents shout at her and call her names. A child says to a rabbit police officer in close-up, "My mommy wishes you were dead." A rabbit's boss shouts at her. Two male antelopes shout at each other nightly in their apartment. A delivery truck driver nearly hits a fox and shouts angrily at him. A fox says that he sold a smelly skunk rug and that the buyer is angry. TV news shows a caribou on a gurney and a reporter says the animal was mauled by a polar bear. A fox hears a rabbit speak fast and excitedly and says, "I thought she was talking in tongues." A rabbit speaks to a fox and cries for insulting him by saying predators are savage only because of their biology. A rabbit plays a recording of a sheep's confession to poisoning predators to make them savage.

PROFANITY 2 - 1 mild scatological term, 6 mild anatomical terms. 2 mild obscenities, name-calling (crazy, nuts, goofy, stupid, stupidest, moron, jerk, dumb, dum-dum, dumb bunny, fuzzy wuzzy, country bumpkin, farm girl, Podunk, token bunny, carrot farmer, carrot face, cottontail, carrots, meter maid, savage, clown badge, three-wheeled joke mobile, pathetic, small-mind, loser, flabby, little dickens, popsicle hustler, hero, sad insipid fox, miserable, shifty lowlife, ignorant, irresponsible, dirty rats, rust bucket, Officer Fluff, Flopsey Mopsey, Officer Tutu, Duke of Bootleg), exclamations (City Hall is right up my tail, heck, gosh, Whoopsie, Oh dear, Oh mutton chops, sweet cheese and crackers, cripes, shut-up, shut it, shut your tiny mouth, shut your mouth), 9 religious exclamations (Holy Cripes, By God, Amen, Hallelujah, Oh Glorious Day, Oh my God, Ohmmmmmm, Oh My Goodness, Speak of the devil). [profanity glossary]

SUBSTANCE USE - Fourteen animals are subjected to a poisonous drug that makes them wildly savage, and a sheep distills small blue flowers into a neon blue liquid running through long glass tubing that makes the drug into capsules to shoot from a handgun.

DISCUSSION TOPICS - Multiculturalism, stereotypes, workplace discrimination, police work, idealism, fear, revenge, racism, bigotry, bullies, tax evasion, kidnapping, poisoning, blackmail, teamwork, cooperation, determination, friendship, trust, forgiveness, redemption, changing the world, justice, starting a new life.

MESSAGE - Racism, xenophobia and stereotypes can be overcome for the greater good and personal satisfaction.

Special Keywords: S1 - V3 - P2 - MPAAPG

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